Skip to navigation

Blog


Be sure to subscribe to our Blog to stay in tune with
the latest and greatest about Recruitment Process Outsourcing


Interview Questions that Reveal Everything

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

You have thirty minutes to gather all the information you need to make the perfect hire. You’re aware of the negative impact that a bad hire has on a company and you want to leave confident knowing you made the right decision. Where do you start? Our own John Younger offers up his top three interview questions that reveal everything about the candidate.

Read the Full Article

  • Excessive Interviews Kill Candidate Spirit

    July 3, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    Whoever said you can’t have too much of a good thing never had to go to 17 interviews for a single position. That may sound excessive (and you’d be right to think so,) but it is common practice in certain companies to subject candidates to multiple rounds of interviews, even into the double digits. Dr. John Sullivan refers to this phenomenon as “Death by Interview”. No, nobody has died yet from being asked too many questions, but the pain is real. Forcing a candidate to come back over and over again to answer the same questions as they did in the previous round turns even the most cool-headed people on their ear. Dr. Sullivan says that excessive interviewing puts an unfair amount of stress on the candidate, especially those candidates who are already employed elsewhere. Though interviews are always going to be a bit nerve-racking to candidates, they should still be a somewhat pleasant experience. If your company requires the new blood to come in for 5 or more interviews, you should put on the brakes and try to empathize with your prospective employees. To read Dr. Sullivan’s report on Death By Interview, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article

  • The Case For the Middle-Aged Unemployed

    July 2, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    If age comes with wisdom, then why is it still so hard for middle aged people to bounce back from unemployment? A large chunk of the long-term unemployed in America (jobless in excess of 27 weeks) are those 55 and over. The conventional wisdom (or the stereotypes) that contribute to this phenomenon is that Baby Boomers don’t have the technical skills required in the modern workplace and are expensive to train. As in, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks. Though this perception of the middle-aged unemployed has hindered their economic progress, it’s not all bad for the generation of erstwhile flower children. According to an article from the Harvard Business review, the average age of entrepreneurs in industries like technology, medicine and aerospace is 40. There are actually twice as many entrepreneurs over the age of 50 as there are under 25. These statistics show that the middle-aged unemployed should not be discounted merely to cut corners on training. They have drive, something that can’t always be taught, and are hungry to prove themselves in today’s workplace. To read the article from the Harvard Business Review, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article

  • Evaluating Hiring Managers

    July 1, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    Evaluating a hiring manager must be based on more than just their claims of getting a “special feeling” from promising candidates. Sure, they can be personable, professional and even savvy enough to bring some nice talent to the table; but what are the concrete qualities that make an excellent hiring manager? For the answer to this question, here’s an article on how to “Develop a Hiring Manager Scorecard to Make them More Accountable”. This article goes into depth about the key metrics that you should use in evaluating the success of a particular manager. Unsurprisingly, the first metric that you should always look for in hiring managers is the one that effects your business the most: quality of hire and retention rate. Quality of hire can be evaluated in several ways. If you want evaluations by the numbers, simply compare the output of new hires onboarded by the manager in question and measure it against the output of other recent additions to your company. Other methods of evaluating the quality of new hires involve surveying the manager’s superior or the head of the department where these new hires are going. Though this method isn’t as exact as the previous one, it will still give you a good idea about how good the manager is at picking quality talent. Retention rate is the second most important metric, because high turnover is a costly phenomenon. Make sure that your managers are picking talent that’s committed to more than just 6 months on the job.

  • Social Networks as Second Highest Talent Source

    June 28, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...


    One of the most important sources for talent in 2013 is social networks. Not only do professional networks such as LinkedIn provide a simple and mostly visual interface for people searching through high volumes of potential hires, but they also have used their popularity to gather key data about their more successful users. In fact, for 2013, recruiters said that social networks were their second largest source of talent, just a few percentage points behind employee referral programs.

    Social networks have also proven to be quite useful in establishing and strengthening employer brands. The ability to push out content as well as interact on social networks builds a company’s web presence faster than ever before. According to a LinkedIn report on 2013 recruiting trends, most US based recruiters see employer branding as a threat to their business, fearing that their competitors will create stronger brands than they can. Even though US recruiters put building their employer brand at the bottom of their list of priorities, 85 percent believe that “employer brand has a significant impact on ability to hire great talent.” Like I’ve been saying for months, employer branding is key. It’s who your company is to potential hires. To read the recruiting trends from LinkedIn, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article

  • How to Keep Your Top Employees

    June 27, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    Today’s job market is in a constant flux. This can make retaining top talent a challenge for some companies. Factors such as an employee’s estrangement from the company culture, or working under a manager that they don’t get along with/don’t respect, can lead to that person looking for a new place to work. This isn’t to say that you should fear your office walking out after every performance review, but just remember that for many employees, the grass is always greener. So you need to maintain your lawn! Be aware of how your employees feel about working for you, and also of what they may want to be done differently. A survey from Forbes reveals that 70% of employees don’t feel appreciated or valued by their employer, and 30% believe they’ll be working somewhere else within the next 12 months.

    It’s true that you can’t stop everyone from leaving, but by making sure that you engage your employees on a personal level about what they want and need out of their job, you’re making progress toward greater retention. The same Forbes article lists the top reason for employees jumping ship: management’s failure to engage their talent’s passions, intellect and creativity. Basically, don’t box your people in. If a little creative control makes them more engaged, then, well…what are you waiting for? To read the “10 Reasons Your Top Talent Will Leave You” from Forbes, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article

  • Perks Make the World Go ‘Round

    June 26, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    Surely, by now, most people in the business world are aware of offices that boast rock climbing gyms, catered lunches, bean bag chairs and supposedly unlimited vacation days. These places may seem more appealing to work at (which is the sole point of these perks in many cases), but in actuality, there are usually trade-offs hidden under the thin veil of creature comforts. By having food available on the premises, an expectation is placed onto employees to eat at their desks, rather than forage through any local food courts or other eateries. The idea behind this is, of course, to increase productivity. But, as it turns out, being at your desk for longer doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to get more work done. According to “The Myth of the Cool Office”, an article from The Atlantic Wire, workers waste 2 billion minutes of productive time per day in their pursuit of snacks, coffee, delicious sandwiches and other amenities. By encouraging employees to treat the office more like their second home, it’s possible for many of them to get a little too comfortable. To read “The Myth of the Cool Office”, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article

  • Investing in Strong Fits With Your Company Culture

    June 24, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    Remember being a young guy or gal on the playground and getting your introduction to in-groups and out-groups? Whether you were one of kids that wanted to play sports or one of the kids who wanted to pretend they were dinosaurs sinking in a tar pit, you were drawn to those who you could naturally play with. The same principal applies in the adult working world. When you’re considering onboarding a candidate, this sort of innate meshing with your company’s culture should be high on your list of priorities. Sure, it would be nice to always hire the most impressive candidate, but if they’re not cut out for day-to-day interactions with their team members, you look to a candidate who will actually enjoy coming in to work. According to an article from ERE.net, hiring an employee that is a good cultural fit means greater job performance, more commitment and a tendency to stick with your organization. By hiring for cultural similitude, you’re getting loyal employees and saving time and money by avoiding misfits who will probably jump ship. To read the article on cultural fits from ERE.net, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article

  • Words of Wisdom from Google Guru

    June 21, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    For a company that deals as heavily in data as Google, it makes sense that their hiring function should be similarly numbers-driven. Everything is recorded and analyzed, their internal processes adjusting to the very metrics generated by the adjustments of their internal processes. While this can sound a little closed-off, this careful in-house analysis has yielded some interesting results, some of which challenge conventional hiring wisdom. In a New York Times interview given earlier this week by Google’s Lazlo Block, he revealed that several common predictors of success (GPA, test scores and even the interview) are not as important as we thought. Indeed, Google doesn’t even look at the GPA of their applicants any longer. One of the most interesting revelations given by Block was that hiring managers who think that they have a special sense for talent, actually do not. You can never have too much focus on your hiring function and Google shows us what we can all learn about challenging the norm in hiring. To read the New York Times article, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article

  • Hiring For Skill, Not Appearance

    June 20, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    There are a lot of things you can do to improve your chances in an interview. You can pick out your best outfit, prepare all your materials and even practice questions in the mirror if you’re that kind of person. But how about losing a few pounds, or even more than a few? According to a new study out of Germany, HR professionals consistently underestimated the workplace abilities of overweight and obese people. The HR test subjects were given photos without any reference to the occupations of the people they were evaluating, and low-balled heavier folks across the board. We can’t help the hand we’re dealt, and passing a candidate up just for aesthetic reasons seems counter productive. In the United States, where 36% of people over 20 are technically obese, odds are that you will encounter plenty of candidates who are overweight. Being fat isn’t unprofessional, but passing someone up because they’re fat is. To read an ERE.net article on the German survey, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article

  • Value of Critical Thinking Skills on the Rise

    June 19, 2013
    1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
    Loading ... Loading ...

    Employers aren’t happy. Across the board, those in charge of hiring at US companies are dissatisfied with the quality of the applicants that are turning up on their doorstep. If it’s not their lack of education, it’s their lack of experience. If it’s not their lack of charisma, it’s their lack of data analysis skills. A glimmer of hope for both job seekers and employers comes in the form of a new survey from Wakefield Research which suggests that employers are more interested in well-rounded candidates than those with narrowly-focused skill sets. Apparently, 93% of employers say that they value “soft skills” such as problem solving, communication and critical thinking skills. (Score +1 for those of you with Humanities degrees out there!) While this is just one survey that certainly won’t end the job search woes of people with BAs, the take home message here is that when presenting yourself to an employer, highlighting all of your skills is important. Communication skills and problem solving might not seem tough, but these are qualities that not everyone possesses. Stand out from the crowd by highlighting your “soft skills” at your next interview. To read an article discussing this survey further, click the link below.

    Read the Full Article