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Interview Questions that Reveal Everything

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You have thirty minutes to gather all the information you need to make the perfect hire. You’re aware of the negative impact that a bad hire has on a company and you want to leave confident knowing you made the right decision. Where do you start? Our own John Younger offers up his top three interview questions that reveal everything about the candidate.

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  • Are You Getting Left Behind? Why Best-in-Class Companies are Using RPOs

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    Is your company using outdated recruiting practices? Find out why 80% of enterprise companies are outsourcing their recruiting, how to reduce your recruiting costs and how to increase your hiring managers’ satisfaction.

    Don’t get left behind! Find out how to gain that competitive edge by outsourcing your recruiting!

    Accolo, the leading on-demand Recruitment Process Outsourcing (RPO) provider, did a survey of approximately 2,000 professionals containing segments of 33% each of HR professionals, Hiring Executives and Candidates to measure the satisfaction of each in the recruit-to-hire process. The results provide some great insight as to the tactical significance Read More…

  • Managing Your Team Like Apple and Google

    November 6, 2013
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    What are the priorities of a manager? If your first answer is “management”, then you might want to think this through a little more. Managing employees is a lot more than making sure nobody is playing Facebook games or similarly getting away with murder; first and foremost, it’s about creating a work environment that allows everyone on your team to put their best foot forward and feel comfortable doing it. This is especially true for managers in charge of collaborative or creative teams, wherein, communication and cooperation are key. Read More…

  • Job Seekers Swayed by Employee Testimonials

    November 5, 2013
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    More and more, job seekers are being effected by the employment brands of the companies that they apply to. Whether they find out about how it is to work for you from an industry forum or straight from one of your employees through a social network, candidates are factoring employment branding into their decision making.

    Don’t just take our work for it. According to an article by Hay Group’s David Smith, online reviews carry a good deal of weight with people in the US. In a survey of over 1000, it was determined that 90 percent of them were influenced by a positive review and 86 percent by a negative review. Read More…

  • Employee Dissatisfaction Hitting All Time High

    November 4, 2013
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    Job satisfaction is at an all time low. While there are many factors that have contributed to this phenomenon, one of the most common situations that have workers grumbling is being understaffed in the wake of layoffs. In these uncertain times, many companies are trying to get as much out of their workers as possible.  Read More…

  • Passive or Active, a Candidate’s a Candidate

    November 1, 2013
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    What is the ultimate goal of your employment branding? For most companies that have made a substantial effort to create or improve their employment brand, the purpose is to draw in talent. Plain and simple. Having a respectable and attractive employment brand means that even professionals that are already employed will keep your company in the back of their minds. This is especially true when these professionals happen to have a particularly unpleasant day with their current employer. Read More…

  • Creative New Uses For LinkedIn

    October 29, 2013
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    LinkedIn is a resource that returns dividends only through calculated and intelligent effort by the user. True, an opportunity may fall into your lap every once in a while;  for the most part, what you get out is close to what you put in. If you don’t use the site to you and your business’s advantage, then you could just be wasting your time.

    For some innovative examples for using the site, we turn to Cheryl Connor, Forbes contributor and communications expert. The first example of LinkedIn creativity that she mentioned was that of a client assessing the marketing capabilities of his competitor. Using only LinkedIn, the client in question was able to construct a complete diagram of the personnel structure of the competitor’s marketing department, the people in those roles and even find a list of former employees that had turned freelance. The client was then able to go to his board of directors and show exactly how their marketing department stacked up against the competition.

    Another fantastic use for LinkedIn mentioned in the article was sales re-enforcement. If we take the classic 6 contact paradigm for closing a sale (that it takes roughly 6 communications to close), then LinkedIn is a salesman’s new best friend. By adding someone on LinkedIn after initial contact, your interactions have jumped from 1 to 3 (your request and their response to that request). Hopefully, these examples have shown you the potential that intelligent networking has for both you and your business. When this many people are connected, the only limitation is your imagination. 

  • Dealing With Hiring Mistakes

    October 28, 2013
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    The cost of a bad or under-performing hire is usually a lot more than their salary. When considering the toll that a bad hiring decision takes on your company, you must not only examine bad performance, but also the frustration that they cause their coworkers and the customers that they can alienate. If a new hire is still asking everyone within earshot for help with the day-to-day 6 months into the job, chances are that 6 more months’ floundering will have them just about where they are now.

    The best course of action when dealing with a bad hire is to sever ties as soon as possible. It might be frustrating to start the job process all over again, but getting rid of  these employees quickly will save you a lot of time in the long run. According to Dr. John Sullivan, HR thought leader based in Silicon Valley, there are a few ways to get problem employees out the door with very little fuss. The first option mentioned in the ERE article is known as a “no-fault divorce”. It involves offering a poor performer several months of pay and a good reference to resign after the first 6 months of employment. This way, the new hire can either bow out or face their annual review 6 months later, receiving a bad reference if they are still found to be lacking.

    Several of the other methods that Dr. Sullivan mentioned fall under the category of extended onboarding and mentorship for new employees. The idea here is to at once provide employees with a greater chance to excel in their work as well as identifying the poor performers from early on. Think of it as a simultaneous evaluation and education process for your new employees. Remember, no matter how much you may want your hiring decisions to work out, the reality is that people are easy to misjudge on interview day.

  • How Key are Keywords?

    October 28, 2013
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    For those employers that advertise on job boards, you know the importance of enticing job seekers to look through your ad and actually apply to the position. Unfortunately, with the sheer volume of jobs being posted to these sites, the most eloquent job title and description will get you nothing if it is buried behind 5 or 6 pages of similar jobs. Let’s be realistic, exponentially fewer people will browse each successive page of results. This makes using pertinent keywords of the utmost importance.

    According to Simply Hired’s Leonard Palomino, there is a large discrepancy in words that employers are using to describe their positions versus the words that job seekers are querying in job board searches. In the article, Palomino uses the example of  the key word results from the healthcare section of a job board. While job seekers focused their search criteria on role and specialty (nurse, technician, radiology,  practitioner, etc.), employers were using more general healthcare terms as well as those related to the responsibilities of the position (health, medical, experience, patient, etc.).

    With millions of job ads to compete with, including the relevant key words that job seekers are searching is becoming more of a basic requirement than an advantage. Yes, it is good to stand out from the pack, but you can’t really do that when the pack is crowding you down to page 10 of search results. You can still craft an appealing and unique job ad while still including the keywords to get you seen by as many job seekers as possible. Just treat it like Mad Libs:

    We are looking for a  _______ who can ________ with the utmost _____________ and has a highly developed ________.

    Well, not quite like Mad Libs, but you get the idea.

  • Why Passion is the Most Valuable Trait in Employees

    October 25, 2013
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    finding employees with passion is the most important traitWhat is the most important trait to look for when hiring new employees? Is is an enterprising, creative spirit? Is it a strong work ethic and a pragmatic approach to the workplace? Let me put it to you that it is in fact how driven the employee is that makes the most difference in their output and commitment to your company. Sure, they may have a real nose-to-the-grind-stone outlook for the first 6 months, but if they lack passion for the work then they are missing the key ingredient for sustained, long term performance.

    At this point you might be saying “But everyone tries to seem passionate during their job interview. How do I even start looking for passionate hires?”  For a little help, we’ll use Deloitte’s article on “The Passion of the Explorer” (basically their blueprint of perfect employee passion). According to them, passion is made up of the following 3 characteristics: a long term commitment to a specific domain (goal oriented and unruffled by short term turbulence), a questing disposition (always seeking knowledge from new challenges) and a connecting disposition (tendency to form strong, trust based relationships). Apparently, 79% of employees that surveyors found to be passionate said that they were working for their “dream organization” even if they were not in their “dream position”. Clearly, these traits correspond to comitted, happy employees.

    As hard as passion may be to quantify, it is one of the most valuable attributes that you can hope for in an employee. By encouraging your passionate employees and hiring people that share their drive for business, you’ll get more out of your team than you ever expected.

  • Why You Need to Re-Recruit Your Top Employees

    October 23, 2013
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    employee retention strategiesIf you are lucky enough to have some real star employees on your team, you must get used to the fact that external recruiters and other businesses are aware of their presence as well. With the connectivity of social media, the superstar software developer doesn’t go “off the market” when they sign up with you and yours. They don’t even go off the radar in many cases. According to an article from Dr. John Sullivan, HR thought leader and ERE.net contributor, your top employees may be receiving upwards of 5 communications or offers per-week from recruiters and your competitors.

    While it may feel a bit like poaching, there is no Star Employee Protection Agency in the wings to prevent a competitor from snatching away your rare, prized Idea Guy from the marketing department. The best way to work against these external forces is to periodically “re-recruit” your top performing employees. Dr. Sullivan compared it to a married couple re-affirming their wedding vows to strengthen the relationship.

    Employee Retention Strategies

    The most effective strategies for employee retention are to keep your star employees interested with new opportunities within the company and to make sure that they feel recognized for their achievements at your company. It could mean offering them an entirely new set of responsibilities in their department, a pay increase or even business travel opportunities. Basically, you just want to keep your top performers excited about working for you.

    Additionally, giving your employee more flexibility for when they come and go from work, can also help do wonders for retaining them. Think about it, by giving them this flexibility you’re showing them that you have a high level of trust for them, something that other companies will not be able to replicate.

    Another important point to make is about how your re-recruitment will compare as a counter offer to another company’s recruiting efforts. In short, an external offer will always be more exciting because your employee has probably been given an extremely rosy, idealized picture of the job. They already know what it’s like working for you and this makes re-recruiting as a counter offer a rather weakened strategy. Instead, try to do it every 18-24 months to try and solidify any loyalty your top employees have for your company so that they will be more resistant to other offers in the first place.